Is Meditation a Key to Spiritual Formation?

Thursday is for Discipleship

“Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted.”
(Hebrews 12:3, ESV)

Meditation on the life of Christ, specifically on the suffering of Christ seems to be a key ingredient to the writer of Hebrews’ disciple-growing strategy.

Do you know what Biblical Meditation is? What part does it play in your own spiritual development?

Question:
What part does the art of biblical meditation have in your disciple-growing strategy or your own personal growth in the grace and knowledge of Christ?

UPDATE:  Check back in often at the “Schedule” tab under the “Where’s Marty” pull down menu for new place and times for the seminar, THE ART OF BIBLICAL MEDITATION.
Contact Amy@MyTrinity.tv to find out more.


5 thoughts on “Is Meditation a Key to Spiritual Formation?

  1. A time of reading Scripture, meditation and prayer is an essential part of the “beginning the day” process. Without it, I know that the day is going to be a struggle, with it I am equipped to begin the day, continuing in the day requires that I keep 1 Thess 5:16-18 firmly before me.

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    1. Amen John. Starting the day with Scripture reading is a MUST do part of the process and the verses you have chosen as a part of that time are great perspective changers that root us in living for Christ.

      Specifically, I am asking how do we “Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself”? How do we do it ourselves, and how do we help others do it?

      If there is power for “not growing weary or fainthearted” in “considering him” how do we daily, weekly, yearly inculcate this pattern of thinking into our everyday lives?

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      1. “If there is power for “not growing weary or fainthearted” in “considering him” how do we daily, weekly, yearly inculcate this pattern of thinking into our everyday lives?”

        By “Rejoicing always, praying without ceasing, and giving thanks in all circumstances for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus” coupled with a daily discipline of reading, praying and meditating in the Scriptures will, without a doubt, infuse the mind of Christ in us. And I think that is the pattern of thinking we are looking for.

        Or am I still missing your question?

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  2. Mr. Marty….

    Is the writer of Hebrews asking us to reflect on the willing woundedness of Christ, the sacrifice of Christ, the brokenness of Christ by sinners — and in this we are strengthened to endure our own Christian walks? And, if so — yes, how do we do this?

    Prayerfully considering with you… *Thank you*

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    1. Ann,
      Always a joy to see evidence of your visits, but please, “Marty” is more than enough of an address.

      Good question and I think John has already given a simple but not simplistic answer. (He specializes in these things. He keeps things profoundly un-complex but with almost a time-release kind of depth.) But for a moment, let’s look at the immediate context of verse 3. Going back two verses we read:

      1 Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, 2 looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.

      There is so much to plumb here but let me focus on what I think is primary. What is “the joy that was set before him” that enabled the Savior to endure the cross and despise the shame? What was that joy? My conclusion is that there are two options and they are inseparably joined. The joy set before Christ is the joy of saving sinners and presenting them to the Father for the greater glory of the triune God. The joy set before Christ was the intensity of his love for us and Father’s joy in fulfilling the mission to redeem a people for himself.

      That goal, that vision, relationship with us, was the source of the passion to endure the unspeakable sorrow of the cross, physical and spiritual. “Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted.” Such consideration of such a love, is a balm to the soul in all of its sorrows in a sin-infested world longing for its redemption.

      Hope that helps.

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