A Challenge to Christians Related to Conservation

Monday Discussion

Water Science Photo Gallery
All of Earth’s Water in a Single Sphere

“This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth’s water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers), with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers).”

Credit: Illustration by Jack Cook, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (©; Howard Perlman, USGS. Data source: Igor Shiklomanov’s chapter “World fresh water resources” in Peter H. Gleick (editor), 1993, Water in Crisis: A Guide to the World’s Fresh Water Resources (Oxford University Press, New York). Source: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/2010/gallery/global-water-volume.html

All the water in the oceans, in every lake, river, stream, all the water in every person, and the water in the atmosphere, even the water in your tomato plants and pets is contained in that blue dot. That’s it. Our lives exist in a precarious balance on this earth that our good God has provided for us.

Question:
What is a disciple’s responsibility related to conservation of resources on the gift God has given?

Marty Schoenleber, Jr. is the founding pastor of one church, the teaching pastor of another and the church planting trainer/mentor of over 200 other church planting pastors. He is adjunct professor of Church Planting at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and has taught Preaching at the International School of Theology, and Evangelism at Moody Graduate School of Theology.  His latest book is Picking a President: Or Any Other Elected Official (CrossBooks, June 2012]). To enjoy a free subscription to his blog, log-on to www.chosenrebel.wordpress.com, where you can post your comments, view past blogs in our archive and read the latest reflections on church planting, Biblical Expositions and musings about church, culture and spiritual formation. Follow Pastor Marty on twitter @1Chosenrebel4JC.

5 thoughts on “A Challenge to Christians Related to Conservation

    • Brought this one over from Facebook.

    Kevin Tupper
    How small a sphere would the drinkable water be? Much, much smaller I suppose. Fortunately it is renewable to an extent, but it certainly isn’t evenly or generously shared. I’m thinking for instance of how much the US inefficiently sucks out of the Colorado river to support a comfortable life in the desert and how little we leave for our southern neighbor Mexico.

    Like

      1. Some simple things we consciously do. . .

        – We don’t leave the water running unnecessarily.
        – We normally drink water – each having our own cup, only washing when necessary.
        – We take reasonably short showers (most of the time.)

        Like

        1. This is the kind of thing we need to work on first. It is too easy to site a problem at the national and global level and avoid the local responsibility that we have. Kind of an application of taking care of the speck in our own eye first.

          Like

        2. Some other ideas:
          1. drink less bottled water and recycle the bottles you do use.
          2. plant low water use flowers and trees
          3. volunteer to clean local rivers and streams
          4. use a rain-barrel to water plants
          5. wash your car on your lawn rather than your driveway
          6. buy a water filter for your tap and stop buying water at a grocery store.

          Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.