God Judges Nations for Their Brutality Against the Unborn

Amos the Prophet

At the time of Amos’ prophecy, Israel was a rich and powerful nation. Yet, Amos took them to task for ignoring the poor, failing to exercise justice, and reducing their religion to mere ritual. How can we avoid these pitfalls which seem to periodically haunt God’s people throughout history? Come hear the challenge and to have a walk with Christ that is full of integrity in thought, word, and action. Read Amos’ whole message.

And here is a help from Kairos Journal on implication of Amos’ prophecy for modern America.

God Judges Brutality against the Unborn

Thus says the LORD: “For three transgressions of the Ammonites, and for four, I will not revoke the punishment, because they have ripped open pregnant women in Gilead, that they might enlarge their border.”

Amos 1:13 (ESV)

Horrendous violations of the sanctity of human life have been justified in the name of national well-being. Slavery was defended as necessary to both England’s and America’s material prosperity. The Jewish Holocaust was perpetrated to protect the racial purity of the German state. Today, abortion is protected for the cause of convenience, “privacy,” “mental health,” population control, or gender selection. God judged these sins in the past, and He will not permit such wickedness to go unpunished in the future.

Peering below the surface of national prosperity, the prophet Amos troubled the waters by pointing to the idolatry and other wickedness of Israel in the north (7:10-17) and Judah in the south (2:4-5). Both would suffer God’s wasting judgment and foreign captivity, the former kingdom under the Assyrians (c. 722 B.C.), the latter under the Babylonians (c. 586 B.C.).

Israel and Judah, however, were not the only targets. The message of their peril was matched by a series of oracles against their neighbors, including Aram, Philistia, Edom, and Ammon. The source of their sin was their failure to keep “the covenant of brotherhood” (1:9); they had violated God’s universal command to love their neighbors as themselves.

The Ammonites, to the east of Jordan, were descendants of Ben-ammi, Lot’s younger son (Gen. 19:38). Thus, they were regarded as relatives of Israel and were to be treated kindly (Deut. 2:19). Yet, these kinfolk were hardly a gentle people. Motivated by materialism and nationalism, they resorted to terrorism and genocide; they “ripped open pregnant women in Gilead, that they might enlarge their border” (1:13; see also 2 Kings 8:12, 15:16; Hosea 13:16 for references to this practice.) God took notice, and the Ammonites fell in due course.

Similarly, modern man can rest assured that the brutality of abortion will not go unpunished. Though expectant women do not share the Ammonites’ motives and do not themselves wield the instruments of death, the result is the same—the slaughter of innocents. The destruction of unborn children, one’s tiniest neighbors, is a violation of God’s creation. Just as He brought ruin on the Ammonites for brutalizing pregnant women and killing their unborn children, so He will judge any nation that violates the lives of those who are made in His image and likeness.

Political peace and material prosperity are no guarantees of a healthy society. They sometimes mask deep fissures in a nation’s foundations, cracks made by prevailing sin. Promiscuous abortion laws threaten the structural integrity of any state, but a people whose genuine love for neighbors includes protecting unborn neighbors in the womb can expect acclaim, not condemnation, from God’s prophets.


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